WoodWeek – 9 March 2022

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Greetings from a lovely start to autumn in Rotorua! Thanks to Forest360 for the opener for this first autumn issue. The nights might be getting cooler, but thankfully log export markets are keeping things warmer. March at wharf gate (AWG) export prices surprised many with solid increases from several exporters but a very wide spread of around $15/JAS between either end of the spectrum. A grade in most ports (excluding Gisborne) is in the early $140’s/JAS which is $10/JAS over the 3-year average. The disparity between exporters is primarily due to the rapidly increasing freight costs with some having been smart/lucky enough to fix March rates earlier than others.

Staying with markets, but turning to carbon now, change is coming. Forestry Minister Stuart Nash and Climate Change Minister James Shaw have released a public discussion document that seeks feedback on ideas to better manage afforestation.

“Climate change is a challenge we cannot postpone. The government wants to encourage afforestation to help meet our climate change targets, offset carbon emissions, and also help farmers, landowners and investors diversify their income streams,” said Stuart Nash.

“We want to balance the risks created by new permanent exotic forests which are not intended for harvest. We have a window to build safeguards into the system, prior to a new ETS framework coming into force on 1 January 2023.

“From 2023, under current rules, a new permanent forest category of the ETS would allow both exotic and indigenous forests to be registered in the ETS and earn New Zealand Units (NZU). We are now proposing to exclude exotic species from the permanent forest category.”


With that news on we are pleased to announce that shortly we will be launching details for our 4th Carbon Forestry Conference. We are planning to run it as an in-person event on 9-10 August in Rotorua with online registrations available for people outside of New Zealand.

Also, coming in May we will introduce our newest event, FIEA Environmental Forestry 2022 Conference. See our event website for our practical and learned speakers’ programme. We have addressed issues highlighted by forest companies large and small. There are plenty of good practices being developed up and down the country. Our new conference, is designed for foresters, forest managers and people with ‘boots-on the-ground’ across our management and contracting workforces. Registrations are open now, see the website.

The continuing dialogue between Dame Anne Salmond and Phil Taylor on behalf of FOA is upated in today's issue. Anne Salmond: If ever there was doubt NZ had gone up a blind climate alley by moving towards large plantings of pine trees, the latest international scientists' report has firmly laid that to rest, she writes.

It is now beyond doubt that New Zealand’s primary strategy for tackling climate change - offsetting through the Emissions Trading Scheme, with the financial incentives it gives to the large-scale planting of monocultures of exotic pine trees - runs in the opposite direction to international scientific advice.

In the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR6) report, for instance, released yesterday, the practice of “planting large scale non-native monocultures, which would lead to loss of biodiversity and poor climate change resilience” was placed among the ‘Worst Practices and Negative Adaptation Trade-offs’ for temperate forests.

FOA President Phil Taylor: The Forest Owners Association says highly qualified reservations in the latest International Panel on Climate Change report, do not back anthropologist Anne Salmond’s claims that New Zealand should switch exclusively to native trees for its carbon sequestration offsets.

Phil Taylor agrees that the IPCC report has generalised reservations about countries having an overreliance on forest carbon sequestration, in part because of uncertainty in measuring sequestration rates. He says FOA shares this view.

Finally today, here's one for the record books - a positive 1080 protest in Northland.

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Forest 360: Log export market commentary

(OPINION Forest360) Just when you think you might be able to wipe the brow of an unpredictable 2021 and settle down into some form of normality, 2022 decides to have a bit of a flex and show you the fun ride isn’t over yet. Last year saw export log prices swing from record highs to breakeven lows within the space of a few months and so far, 2022 is not looking much different.

The issues around Evergrande and the wider issues in the Chinese construction industry seem to be worrying the media more than the buyers with demand still reasonably solid in the face of continued bad vibes from news reels. The proof will be in the pudding in terms of demand over the next few weeks as the manufacturing sector kicks back into gear following the Chinese New Year holidays. Global supply into China remains subdued and, at present, demand appears to be outstripping supply with sales prices (CFR) increasing $US30/m3 in the past 3 weeks.

Freight has taken the fun out of any price increases with freight rates increasing at a similar rate to sales prices. Some of this is attributed to fuel as barrel prices climb out the gate. To compound issues, the EPA introduced a host of new rules in January this year that all but prevent the use of Methyl Bromide for fumigation. Methyl Bromide is a key fumigant for cargos bound for China which is used on port to fumigate the logs that are stowed on the top deck of a vessel. Now that this is all but impossible, exporters have had to move to debarking deck stowed logs or finding vessels that carry full under deck cargos, further increasing costs and port congestion.

The effect of the Ukraine invasion on freight rates is yet to be fully understood. Putin’s navy conveniently lobbed a missile into the side of a Bangladeshi cargo vessel last week in the Black Sea which has put the frighteners up the shipping industry. This, and the threat of excluding Russia from the Swift payment system, is seeing many of the vessels operating in the Atlantic now headed south to the Pacific which will hopefully free up some capacity and counter some of the increased fuel costs.

March at wharf gate (AWG) export prices surprised many with solid increases from a number of exporters but a very wide spread of around $15/JAS between either end of the spectrum. A grade in most ports (excluding Gisborne) is in the early $140’s/JAS which is $10/JAS over the 3-year average. The disparity between exporters is primarily due to the rapidly increasing freight costs with some having been smart/lucky enough to fix March rates earlier than others.

It is likely that the CFR price will continue to climb over the next few months and the ability to see this in AWG prices will rely solely on how far the shipping companies can push their rates. To compound matters, the $NZ:USD has climbed $NZ0.02 over the past few days which has the net effect of removing $NZ5/JAS from sales prices.

NZ log supply is usually peaking during March but Covid will probably pull the handbrake on as it infiltrates the supply chain. The biggest issue will be at the ports with marshalling companies already signalling reduced hours in reaction to staff illness. Port congestion is generally an issue at this time of year anyway but, as every log needs to be measured and bar coded before it’s loaded on a ship, absenteeism is likely to put a stranglehold on the NZ supply in the short to medium term.

Carbon has traded some solid increases in 2022 breaking through the $85/NZU mark before retreating to just under $80/NZU at close of play last week. This represents around $50k/ha or $1,900/ha/year for those who are in the averaging scheme. Sounds appealing but don’t expect to plant your hill country out this year as seedlings and labour are already spoken for.

We are continually fielding calls from landowners wanting to plant this year, however, we (and most other companies) are fully committed for 2022 and 2023 is filling up fast. Minister Nash has recently indicated changes to policy settings so that Radiata will no longer be allowed as a permanent forest species. This will be viewed as a positive sign by many in our industry as large scale, untended, non-productive permanent radiata forests benefit no-one long term and will more than likely create a liability for someone down the track.

Resilience is the key in any commodity-based business, and it looks like 2022 will test how resilient some players in the industry are in the face of rapidly changing and volatile global parameters. Having said that, this is not our first rodeo and we’re all used to wearing steel undies, so bring it on.





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MPI open to consultation on proposed ETS changes

Managing exotic afforestation incentives by changing the forestry settings in the NZ Emissions Trading Scheme

Have your say - The Government is seeking feedback on proposals to achieve better outcomes from afforestation. This includes:
• excluding exotic forests from the permanent post-1989 category in the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS)
• whether to adjust how carbon accounting applies to forests on remote and marginal to harvest land
• opportunities for improving incentives for indigenous afforestation.

Submissions open on 14 March and close at 5pm on 22 April 2022.

The options being proposed for managing afforestation - Afforestation is a key pathway for New Zealand meeting its climate change targets by offsetting carbon emissions, providing a source of bioenergy, and the replacement of high carbon materials.

However, the increasing New Zealand Unit (NZU) price is driving higher rates of afforestation, particularly fast-growing permanent exotic forests. This is raising concern amongst some industry groups and community organisations on the risk of permanent exotic forests displacing pastoral farming, and production and indigenous forests.

To manage these risks, the Government is consulting on:
> whether to prevent exotic forests from registering in the permanent post-1989 category in the NZ ETS. This to ensure any legislative changes can be passed by Parliament before this category commences on 1 January 2023. > a proposal to adjust how the new carbon accounting method in the NZ ETS (averaging accounting) applies to remote and marginal land for harvesting. This is to reflect the later harvest age and extra carbon stored in some forests on remote and marginal to harvest land. opportunities for improving incentives for indigenous afforestation, following on from the Emissions Reduction Plan consultation late last year.
The discussion document provides information on these topics. Questions for your consideration are in Section 13. These questions are a guide, and all comments are welcome. An online submission form will be available soon.


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Two Ministers announce carbon farming change plans

Government: New Rules Proposed For Carbon Farming Of Exotic Forests In Future - new proposal to better manage carbon farming could see future permanent plantings of exotic forests like radiata pine excluded from the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

Forestry Minister Stuart Nash and Climate Change Minister James Shaw have released a public discussion document that seeks feedback on ideas to better manage afforestation.

“Climate change is a challenge we cannot postpone. The government wants to encourage afforestation to help meet our climate change targets, offset carbon emissions, and also help farmers, landowners and investors diversify their income streams,” said Stuart Nash.

“We want to balance the risks created by new permanent exotic forests which are not intended for harvest. We have a window to build safeguards into the system, prior to a new ETS framework coming into force on 1 January 2023.

“From 2023, under current rules, a new permanent forest category of the ETS would allow both exotic and indigenous forests to be registered in the ETS and earn New Zealand Units (NZU). We are now proposing to exclude exotic species from the permanent forest category.”

“We want to encourage the right tree, in the right place, for the right reason. We intend to balance the need for afforestation with wider needs of local communities, regional economies, and the environment. Increased plantings of exotic forests are being driven by rising carbon prices as landowners and investors seek higher returns. The NZU price has more than doubled over the past year, from around $35 in late 2020 to over $80 in February 2022."

“Permanent exotic forests like radiata pine have potential environmental and ecological risks. These include pests, fire, damaged habitats for native species, biodiversity threats, and a relatively short lifespan compared to well-managed mixed indigenous forests."

“Later this year, we will also consult on proposals which could give local councils more powers to decide under the Resource Management Act where exotic forests are planted in their areas,” said Stuart Nash.

Climate Change Minister James Shaw said planting more trees can help us meet our climate goals, but it is important to make sure all types of afforestation are well- managed through the ETS and the planning process.

“Aotearoa was once blanketed with native forests, home to indigenous birds, insects and other wildlife. Today much of those ancient forests are gone, but what remains is still a vital carbon sink,” said James Shaw.

“In its advice to Government, the Climate Change Commission said we need to increase both indigenous and exotic tree planting to meet our emissions targets. But they also warned we need to reduce our overall reliance on forestry offsets, and better manage the impacts of afforestation."

“For example, a proliferation of permanent exotic forestry could result in lower long-term carbon prices and potentially limit investment in low-carbon technologies. At the same time, an increase in native forestry will require additional management efforts to eliminate pests that feed on native trees."

“This consultation is an opportunity for anyone with an interest in the future of forestry to have their say. We particularly want to hear from Māori landowners. Iwi-Māori have significant interests in permanent forestry and we want ensure they are not unfairly impacted.”

The decisions we take now will be felt decades into the future, so it’s really important we get this right,” said James Shaw.

Find out more and have your say at: www.mpi.govt.nz/consultations/managing-exotic- afforestation-incentives

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John Deere release new simulator

John Deere introduces new forestry full-tree training simulator – John Deere announced the release of the new and innovative Forestry Full-Tree Training Simulator. This development offers cost- effective and efficient operator training in a risk-free environment, all while avoiding wear and tear on equipment.

The Training Simulator allows operators to explore interactive virtual logging sites as if they were in the cab of an actual John Deere machine. This product offers realistic, true-to-life controls that can be swapped out to quickly convert the simulator to a different John Deere forestry machine type in a matter of minutes. The simulator is equipped with swappable John Deere controls, allowing quick interchange of joysticks and foot pedals to multiple machine types.

Operators can view the simulation through a single-display, 55” TV. The display screen offers highly detailed, realistic graphics allowing operators to create custom environments, switch between machines in the same environment or mimic stump to landing material flow.

“Our main focus for all operators is safety, comfort, and the control needed to tackle any forestry job. This forestry simulator will be able to provide all three,” said Justin McDermott, John Deere forestry sales and tactical marketing manager.

“We built the Forestry Simulator based on the needs of operators. Mississippi Loggers Association, the Mississippi Forestry Commission, and Stribling Equipment are the first group to adopt the technology to advance their training program. This will provide safe and advanced training solution for their operators.”

The Forestry Simulator offers training for a number of Deere machines including the 953M/959M Tracked Feller Buncher w/ FR22B head, 953MH/959MH Tracked Harvester w/ H480 head, 953ML/959ML Shovel Logger w/ Grapple and FL85 head, 843L-II Wheeled Feller Buncher w/ FD22B Head, and 848L-II Skidder.

This technological advancement is compatible with construction simulator controls and software, and is also available in desktop simulators.

To learn more about the Full Tree Forestry Simulator, customers can contact their local dealer.
www.deere.com/en





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RNZ: Interview on ETS proposed changes

(RNZ) ETS: reward native not pine forest - The Ministry of Primary Industries is considering changing the forestry settings here in New Zealand, discouraging the planting of pinus radiata and long-lived exotic species for long-term carbon planting under the ETS. Seeking feedback to this, MPI has published a discussion document Managing exotic afforestation incentives. Submissions are open now and close on 22 April. Environmental organisations - such as Forest and Bird - are in support - saying native forest and wetland restoration provide a much better long-term carbon solution for carbon storage. But Forest Owners Association chief executive, also managing director of forestry management company Port Blakely Phil Taylor tells Kathryn Ryan says it's not that straightforward and not necessarily the right move.

Listen to the RNZ interview >>




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ANZ: Forestry climbs with other commodities

(ANZ Research) The ANZ World Commodity Price Index surged 3.9% in February to hit yet another record high. Prices lifted across most commodity groups with dairy and aluminium leading the charge.

The forestry index popped up 4.3% in February, retracing some of the recent declines in prices. Buying interest from China has picked up again following the lull in activity associated with the Chinese New Year holiday period. This is putting upward pressure on pricing, as is the relatively low global supply of raw logs.

Forestry was not alone though as the conflict also saw: > Dairy prices gained 7.2% month-on-month (m/m) in February &
> Aluminium prices jumped 7.9% m/m in February after posting a double digit lift the previous month.

Source: ANZ Research


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MPI: ETS afforestation statistics

What are the stats for afforestation and the forests in the ETS? - It is estimated there was nearly 11.5 million hectares of farmland in 2017. Te Uru Rākau – New Zealand Forest Service estimates that 2.8 million hectares of this could be suited to afforestation. Between 1990 and 2019 it is estimated 769,702 hectares of that farmland was converted to forest, as follows:
• 1990-1999 – 490,101ha
• 2000-2009 – 167,989ha
• 2010-2019 – 111,612ha

The Ministry for Primary Industry’s most recent Afforestation and Deforestation Intentions Report estimates that exotic afforestation accounted for 33,600 hectares in new planting in 2020, and 45,300 hectares in 2021. Of this, around 77 percent is intended for production and 23 per cent intended for permanent forest.

A significant proportion of post-1989 forest land in the ETS is on ‘poor quality’ land, classified as Land Use Capability classes 6 to 8, which is often more suited to forestry than agriculture. It accounts for around 88 per cent (308,664 hectares) of the total area in the ETS (349,076 hectares).

Around 89 percent of the registered forest in the ETS is exotic, mostly radiata pine. The balance of 11 per cent is indigenous species, at 37,000 ha. The registered exotic forests are comprised of 255,000 ha radiata pine and 57,000 ha of other exotic species.

In 2021, forests in the ETS sequestered 6.7 million tonnes of CO2 which is equivalent to the annual emissions from 2.5 million cars.

What is the scale of Māori forestry interests? - In 2018, Māori were estimated to own $4.3 billion of forestry assets and some 2,200 Māori were employed in the sector (40% of the forestry workforce). Around 30% of New Zealand’s 1.7 million hectares of plantation forestry is estimated to be on Māori land, and this is expected to grow to 40% as Treaty settlements are completed.

More >>

Source: MPI



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BusinessDesk: Government backs down on exotics in ETS

(BusinessDesk) Govt backs down on permanent exotics forests in ETS - The government's U-turn on exotic forests is another step in the right direction but there is still more to be done, says Beef+Lamb New Zealand. The government is now proposing that future permanent plantings of exotic forests like radiata pine be excluded from the emissions trading scheme (ETS), according to a public discussion document.

“The government wants to encourage afforestation to help meet our climate change targets, offset carbon emissions, and also help farmers, landowners and investors diversify their income streams,” said forestry minister Stuart Nash.

From 2023, under current rules, a new permanent forest category of the ETS would allow both exotic and indigenous forests to be registered in the ETS and earn NZ Units (NZU).

“We are now proposing to exclude exotic species from the permanent forest category,” he said.

No silver bullet - Dave Harrison, B+LNZ’s general manager of policy and advocacy, said it was a “step in the right direction”. However, there’s “no silver bullet” in this and there are “lots of little things that need to be tweaked to ensure we’ve got the incentives right”.

B+LNZ and others have been clamouring for urgent national policy to ensure meeting NZ’s climate change obligations doesn’t come at the expense of rural communities as people look to cash in.

The NZ ETS puts a price on emissions from most sectors of the NZ economy. This encourages investment in lower emissions technologies and practices, including the use of forestry as a carbon sink. However, while exotic forestry makes it possible to reduce net emissions quickly and at a low cost, there has been growing concern about the impact of land-use changes.

“Increased plantings of exotic forests are being driven by rising carbon prices as landowners and investors seek higher returns,” said Nash.

The NZU price has more than doubled over the past year, from around $35 in late 2020 to over $80 in February 2022. He also noted that permanent exotic forests like radiata pine have potential environmental and ecological risks.

Data from the Ministry for Primary Industry shows that exotic afforestation accounted for 33,600 hectares of new planting in 2020 and 45,300 in 2021. Of this, around 77% is intended for production and 23% for permanent forest. Around 89% of the registered forest in the ETS is exotic, mostly radiata pine.

More >>





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Anne Salmond: IPCC report condemnation

(Newsroom: Anne Salmond) - IPCC report condemns forestry use planned by NZ. If ever there was doubt NZ had gone up a blind climate alley by moving towards large plantings of pine trees, the latest international scientists' report has firmly laid that to rest, writes Dame Anne Salmond.

It is now beyond doubt that New Zealand’s primary strategy for tackling climate change - offsetting through the Emissions Trading Scheme, with the financial incentives it gives to the large-scale planting of monocultures of exotic pine trees - runs in the opposite direction to international scientific advice.

In the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR6) report, for instance, released yesterday, the practice of “planting large scale non-native monocultures, which would lead to loss of biodiversity and poor climate change resilience” was placed among the ‘Worst Practices and Negative Adaptation Trade-offs’ for temperate forests.

By way of contrast, to “maintain or restore natural species and structural diversity, leading to more diverse and resilient systems” was placed among the ‘Best Practices and Adaptation Benefits’, with very high impacts.

Last year, in its report Biodiversity and climate change: interlinkages and policy options - Royal Society (UK) 2021, the Royal Society (UK) also advised against establishing large monoculture tree plantations as long-term carbon sinks:

“Policy measures to discourage: Planting trees, either for bioenergy or as long-term carbon sinks, should focus on restoring and expanding native woodlands and avoid creating large monoculture plantations that do not support high levels of biodiversity. Simple targets such as ‘numbers of trees planted’ ignore biodiversity considerations, such as long-term survival of trees or stewardship, and can be misleading, potentially contributing to policy failure and misuse of carbon offsets.”
Likewise, the Report from the Joint workshop COP Panels on Biodiversity and Climate Change 2021recommended discouraging ecosystem-based approaches to climate mitigation that have negative outcomes for biodiversity, such as tree planting in inappropriate ecosystems, and monocultures, for the following reasons:
• Large-scale tree planting can be harmful to biodiversity and food production due to competition for land.
• Afforestation may even reduce existing ecosystem carbon storage, cause further biodiversity loss and displace local people or curtail their access to land and its use. Single species plantations can increase pests and disease.
• Plantations of exotic species often have negative impacts on biodiversity, on adaptive capacity and on many nature’s contributions to people not related to timber production or carbon sequestration, especially if the planted species becomes invasive.

Further, their climate benefits may be offset by local warming, especially in boreal and temperate regions, which is induced by different exchanges of water and energy compared to the land cover which it replaces.

The concept of ‘offsets’ using natural climate solutions has been proposed to achieve early emissions reductions (particularly at lower cost) or to compensate for continued emissions from hard-to-decarbonize sectors; such offsets are increasingly part of ‘net-zero’ emissions pledges.

However, the use of carbon offsets has come under increasing scrutiny because of the challenges of additionality, problems with overstated emissions reductions and double-counting, difficulty in monitoring and verification, and the unclear permanence of such actions, as well as potential social equity impacts of actions like large-scale tree planting.

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FOA takes issue with Anne Salmond IPCC reference

Forest Owners: IPCC Doesn't Back Anne Salmond - The Forest Owners Association says highly qualified reservations in the latest International Panel on Climate Change report, do not back anthropologist Anne Salmond’s claims that New Zealand should switch exclusively to native trees for its carbon sequestration offsets.

FOA President Phil Taylor agrees that the IPCC report has generalised reservations about countries having an overreliance on forest carbon sequestration, in part because of uncertainty in measuring sequestration rates. He says Forest Owners share this view.

“But Dame Anne wants a solution which makes this problem worse. Sequestration in our native trees is extraordinarily slow, hugely expensive, highly variable, uncertain, unknown and would take vast areas of farmland.”

“Wholesale abandonment of New Zealand using pines as a medium-term bridge to getting to a carbon zero economy by 2050 is highly dangerous.”

“Of course, New Zealand needs to quickly and drastically drive down all greenhouse gas emissions. But the huge technical scope and cost of this reduction absolutely needs offset backup through fast-growing exotic forests at the same time.”

“Dame Anne is also quite wrong in her claims of a ‘pine monoculture’. Production pine plantations will support much more indigenous biodiversity than a ryegrass and clover pasture. There is good science to support transition to native trees in pine forests over time.”

But Phil Taylor emphasises that the critical factor in combating climate change is the constantly reducing time available to arrest irreversible climate warming.

“That is way and above the key message in the IPCC report. We are running out of time. Even sequestration from pines, and other fast-growing exotics, takes the best part of 20 years before the volumes of carbon locked up become appreciable.”

“Indigenous forests, for all their natural biodiversity, cultural values and long-term potential as high-quality timber producers, are not going to lock significant carbon in any of our lifetimes – no matter how much we would wish that to happen," Phil Taylor says.

“A particularly poignant and relevant comment was made by Dr Helen Adams, a New Zealander and a lead author of the report, when she stated ‘the future depends on us, not the climate’.”

“New Zealand is well placed with options to meet the challenges of climate change. I’m sure we can find the solutions. We need to act quickly, act on sound technology and science and base our measures on local circumstances.”

“When the government issues its Emissions Reduction Plan in May, we’ll have a clear target to aim for. At the moment, we only have a budget recommendation of an additional 380,000 hectares of exotics to be planted by 2035. That’s only 13 years away – nothing in forestry terms.”

“I had the opportunity to participate in a webinar on the recent Yule Report on forestry this morning. The whole diverse range of other land user representative groups, including Māori stakeholders, discussed the effects of forestry on rural communities.”

“While a few still strongly dispute the benefits of forestry, it was clear that all the main land users appreciate the risk of climate change. That is the real challenge ahead of us," Phil Taylor concluded.

Source: Forest Owners Association



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Waipoua: Positive 1080 protest

Editor - Stop the bus ... here's one for the record books - a 'positive' 1080 protest.
Protesters Demanding 1080 For Waipoua Forest. Protesters congregate outside Whangarei DOC office this morning demanding urgent action for broad-scale possum control in the Waipoua Forest and other Northland forest that are in a critical state.

Spokesperson Geoff Reid says, "For too long our department has been asleep while our forests die. Waipoua, home of iconic giant kauri Tāne Mahuta is in a critical state. It is incredibly sad to see so many ancient kohekohe and tōtara dying."

Demands for aerial possum control and stronger leadership from the Conservation Department are being made.

"There appears to be no comprehension of basic priorities or sense of national duty within the department.We are witnessing thousands of ancient trees being eaten alive by possums, in the sanctuary!"

"If aerial predator control isn't undertaken before the winter possum onslaught begins, many more tuakana trees will die and many will never fully recover all under our watch. I’ve been in the tops of these trees and witnessed the damage with my own eyes. The current state of the canopy indicates that management of the Waipoua Forest Sanctuary borders on criminal negligence.”

"In 1990 Waipoua was the first forest to receive aerial treatment by our Conservation Department. Since then it’s been done twice, and after each drop the forest and birds have started to recover. It’s very successful. It just needs to be done frequently enough.DOC's best standard is every 3 years but with the last drop in 2011 it’s now 8 years overdue!"

Every time aerial 1080 has been used in Northland forests, it’s been reactive, and years too late. This must change if we're to save our forests. Protecting our forests with legislation doesn’t prevent possums and other predators from destroying them. A rainforest like Waipoua requires dedicated protection every 3 years by our Conservation Department.

We wouldn’t condone the chainsawing of our last ancient tōtara in Waipoua, yet the possum plague that our department has allowed is so bad that it is producing the same result. The best tool we have is aerial 1080. Yes, there is some resistance, but it has been supported 3 times in the past and each time it has been highly successful for the mauri of the forest.

Iwi have undertaken boundary control on the southern side of the Sancutary. This is a great start. Aerial 1080 is needed protect the interior of the forest.

We need a new dedicated entity within DOC that delivers timely possum control to provide assurance to the public that the forests of the North are properly protected and have a future. A dedicated entity focused on protecting our Northland forests from predators will also undertake essential education including wananga with local communities.”

A petition has been launched on the oneforenature.org.nz platform.

Source: Scoop news


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Jobs



Buy and Sell



... and finally ... more important than ever

In the past week the results of an ANZ Roy Morgan poll show consumer confidence at an all-time low.

With that unwelcome news, I reckon it's time for a laugh or two:

I called for an ambulance today.
"What seems to be the problem?" asked the operator.
"I stumped my toe on the coffee table." I replied.
"And you want an ambulance for that?" he laughed.
I said, "No, it's for my husband he shouldn't have laughed."

Whoever first spelled the word receipt was an idiopt …

Doesanyoneknowhowtofixastickyspacebar?

I'm pretty sure I have an abnormal convex curvature of the upper spine.
How do I know, you ask? Call it a hunch.

My mates asked me to go camping next weekend so I’ve made a list of everything I need.
1) New mates.

You know me, if I ever win the lottery, rest assured nobody around me will be poor and I really meant it.
I will move to a rich neighbourhood.



That's all for this week's wood news.

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John Stulen
Editor
Innovatek Limited
PO Box 1230
Rotorua, New Zealand
Mob: +64 27 275 8011
Web: www.woodweek.com

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