WoodWeek – 22 October 2014

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Greetings from your WoodWeek team! With the work of the Independent Forest Safety Review now complete, apart from the national media launch taking place at the end of this month, the Forest Industry Contractors Association is testing some of its own ideas with people leading health and safety in NZ's forest industry.

Once again this week, we remind you of our industry invitation for the public release of the report from the Independent Forest Safety Review panel. Next Friday, 31st October, is the official launch of their independent report. The launch will take place at the Distinction Hotel in Rotorua, from 11:00am. We’ve got the details you need about it in today’s issue.

The annual FICA Conference & AGM is coming up on the 7th and 8th of November, in Napier. We have a fantastic couple of days planned, with a special mention to Paul Ego, joining us for the Saturday night dinner. We also have some great activities planned, including a tour of a local log yard, white water rafting, and the option to take a full day winery tour. Registrations are now open for Conference and accommodation is going fast in Napier for this weekend, so make sure you’re booked in!

In Northland recently, a group of more than 100 Maori forest owners are seeking ways to increase earnings. As a result, the group approved a high level strategy with a vision statement, mission, core values and key goals. These goals included making sure that a greater share of any value is returned to the Maori landowners, to build scale and certainty of supply, and to implement value- added manufacturing.

Finally, China has launched a trial ban on commercial logging in state-owned forests. This will be carried out in the vast north-eastern province of Heilongjiang bordering Russia, home to much of the country’s timber industry. Forestry experts have hailed the ban as a major step forward, predicting it will enable timber supplies to recover and shift the industry’s focus towards improved forestry management.

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FICA moots inclusive forest safety model

With the work of the Independent Forest Safety Review now complete, apart from the national media launch taking place at the end of this month, the Forest Industry Contractors Association is testing some of its own ideas with people leading health and safety in NZ's forest industry.

FICA recently completed a project to compare BC forest safety initiatives with the tasks set to be announced by the independent group looking into ways to improve safety here in NZ. The following is an excerpt of a report for FICA by John Stulen.

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ZERO HARM FORESTRY – A MODEL for FOREST INDUSTRY SAFETY IMPROVEMENT

During September 2014 I was fortunate to spend a week with people working across the British Columbia forest industry. I met, observed and worked with over 30 people during this time. Most were participating at all levels of the “industry-owned and driven” safety improvement engagement processes that the BC Forest Safety organisation facilitates. This is a snapshot of what I saw and how it could relate to our New Zealand situation.

• A “CEO Leadership Action Group” will include nominated representatives from forest owners, forest contractors, current workers and leaders from WorkSafe New Zealand. These appointments or nominations from industry organisations will include senior leaders at CEO level of operating companies in the forest industry. This group could act as the board to govern a safety organisation – with a name like: “Zero Harm Forestry” founded on principles and collective action for continuous improvement. It will expedite the actioning, at leadership level, of key recommendations made to the group by the industry management advisory group and all of the technical action groups that operate either permanently or from time to time as deemed appropriate by industry.

• An “Industry Manager Advisory Group” would include nominated forest health and safety, operating contractors and crew managers and inspector managers from WorkSafe. The focus of this group will be to integrate the recommendations it receives from technical action groups with the principles of health and safety improvement, good industry practice, training delivery and development and regulations enforcement. It will work to ensure that recommendations coming to it from the technical action groups are applied across the industry in such a way as to be effective, fair and reasonable in relation to risk management principles for risk groups from small to large forest operations and from forest planting to log transport and port operations.

• There would then be several “Technical Action Groups”, of which there will be at least one permanent and, at any one time, several ‘needs-based’ ones. These will include nominated workers, crew leaders and specialist trainers and assessors from industry supported by training account managers from regional training groups, safety advisors from FICA and bush inspectors from WorkSafe. The focus of these groups would be to use their own technical expertise, industry experience and information provided on near-miss information from the Industry Incident Information System database (IRIS), as well as incident investigation reports and safety alerts from individual companies. Members of the group will seek to gain information from peers working across the forest industry. It could consider operating an ‘open-door’ policy to ensure that people can bring sensitive issues to the group without fear of reprisal or retribution. It will operate based on safety needs for all parts of the forest industry – from small to large forest operations and from forest planting to log transport.

Your thoughts, contribution and feedback on how this model can be taken from concept to reality are appreciated.
Thanks, John Stulen

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Official launch of Independent Forestry Safety Review

Independent Forestry Safety Review
FINAL REPORT


An agenda for change in the forestry sector
Toki pango, toki whero, ka ora tonu ai i te wao nui a Tane
When we all pull together we will ensure the safety of our future generations

The sponsors of the review, the Forest Owners Association,
New Zealand Farm Forestry Association and the
Forest Industry Contractors Association invite you to the

Official Launch
11.00 am – 12.30 pm, 31 October 2014
Distinction Hotel, 390 Fenton St, Rotorua
Come and hear: The panel present their findings
The industry’s endorsement
Plus presentations on best practice in the sector


For the past nine months the Independent Forestry Safety Review Panel has engaged in a thorough process of consultation and analysis of the factors impacting health and safety in the forestry sector. The Report contains a package of practical recommendations that represent the first steps necessary to bring about long-term, system-wide and integrated changes.

The Vision
A safe, sustainable and professional forestry sector by 2017, achieved in partnership by government, industry and workers.

We look forward to seeing you there
Please RSVP by 28 October to glen.mackie@nzfoa.org.nz




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FICA Conference - Registrations Open

The annual FICA Conference & AGM is coming up on the 7th and 8th of November, in Napier. We have a fantastic couple of days planned, with a special mention to Paul Ego, joining us for the Saturday night dinner.

We also have some great activities planned, including a tour of a local log yard, white water rafting, and the option to take a full day winery tour.

Registrations are now open for Conference and accommodation is going fast in Napier for this weekend, so make sure you get yours booked!
Download the brochure and registration form here, or call Tahlia in the FICA office on 07 921 1382.





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China trade needs more than logs says analyst

Two-way trade with China has doubled every five years since the early 1990s but the historic growth rates may not continue unless this country's export mix becomes more value-added and less dependent on agricultural commodities, says the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research.

The analysis, commissioned by the NZ China Council, says the biggest risk facing our trade growth with the Asian mega-market is export "concentration" into a small number of products such as logs and milk powder.

"China's imports from the world remain diversified, but imports from New Zealand have increased in concentration in recent years," NZIER said. "This is a recent development - in the past exports were diversified."

Dairy, meat and forestry products have driven nearly 80 per cent of the recent rise in New Zealand's exports to the world's second-largest economy, according to the analysis.

Kiwi exports to China rose 45 per cent to $10 billion last year, while imports coming in the opposite direction lifted 7 per cent to $8.3 billion.

NZIER said much of the most recent doubling in two-way trade - to about $20 billion from $10 billion in 2010 - was a result of New Zealand exports being redirected to China from other markets, where demand was being sapped by economic downturn, rather than growth in production.

Over the past five years New Zealand's exports to China have grown by $7.4 billion, or almost 300 per cent, while those to the rest of the world fell by $2.3 billion.

Repeating the past growth in commodity exports could not be relied on for the next doubling of trade, NZIER said.

"This is because production increases cannot keep up and future demand may not be for the same commodities or grow at the same pace."

NZIER principal economist Shamubeel Eaqub said things could have got quite ugly for New Zealand if growth in exports to China had not been so strong over the past few years.

"But you can't keep pushing more and more of [the same] products out to one place," Eaqub said. "You can't keep relying on gaining market share."

He said concentration of exports also left New Zealand exposed to market volatility, as highlighted by the current slump in global dairy prices. Meanwhile, NZIER said this country's exports to China would need to grow by 7 per cent a year in order to hit the $30 billion bilateral trade target the two countries want to reach by 2020.

Eaqub said the $30 billion goal was very achievable.

"But we need to be more ambitious because there are all of these opportunities in terms of increasing the value of what we export as well as creating more breadth in what we export."

NZ China Council executive director Pat English said Fonterra's partnership with Chinese infant formula maker Beingmate - through which the dairy co-operative hopes to increase sales of its Anmum infant formula brand in China - was a good example of a New Zealand company taking steps to boost higher-value exports.

Other companies showing strong potential in China included traffic management system developer HMI Technologies, cinema software developer Vista Group and Pure New Zealand Greenshell Mussels, a joint venture between a number of Kiwi seafood firms.

But the Chinese market is notoriously difficult to crack, with English pointing out that China came 96th in the World Bank's ease of doing business rankings.

New Zealand is third-ranked on that list, behind Hong Kong and Singapore.

English said more companies needed to collaborate with firms in the same sector when entering China.

How much trade does NZ do with China?
Kiwi exports to China rose 45 per cent to $10 billion last year. Imports lifted 7 per cent to $8.3 billion.

What's the target?
$30 billion of bilateral trade by 2020.

What's the risk?
Dairy, meat and forestry products have driven nearly 80 per cent of the recent rise in exports. Analysis commissioned by the NZ China Council says the biggest risk facing trade growth is export "concen-tration" into a small number of products such as logs and milk powder.

Source: NZ Herald

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East Cape Road Safety Alert - Cyclists

A note from the Auckland Cycle Touring Association.

“From November 8 to 17 we will have approximately 25 cyclists doing an east coast tour.

We will have a support vehicle that will follow behind with a sign warning drivers but the group could get pretty spread out at times. Our members are all older riders – ranging from early fifties to mid seventies – and are experienced cyclists.
We realise that forestry is an important industry on the east coast and are keen to let logging contractors know that we will be in the area.

Below is an outline of our itinerary.

November 8: Awakeri to Hawai
November 9: Hawai to Waihau Bay
November 10:Waihau Bay to Te Araroa
November 11: To East Cape
November 12: Te Araraoa to Tokomaru Bay
November 13: Tokomaru Bay to Gisborne

After this we head up to Matawai and back to Opotiki via the Old Coach Road.

Thanks for helping us out.”

For more information, contact Louise Sinclair on 021 268 1155 or 09 236 3647

We would appreciate if you could pass this notice on to anyone that may need to be advised.

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Focus needed for Northland forest owners

Now is the time for Maori forestry owners to maximise the returns on their assets, a group of more than 100 Maori forest owners and others associated with the forestry industry were told at a meeting in Moerewa. The meeting sought to explore ways to increase earnings.

Pita Tipene of the Forestry Steering Group said that the outcomes that the meeting had set for itself had been achieved: to gain support for a high level draft Maori forestry strategy and to identify and agree on the membership of a Steering Group to further refine the strategy and begin driving it forward.

The meeting endorsed the following group, including Mr Tipene, Rawson Wright, Rangitane Marsden, Edward Beattie, Hiraina Mitai-Harris, Rod Parkinson (Westpac Bank), Shane Horan (Waipapa Sawmill) and Paul Rupapera (Rosvall Sawmill).

The group would also look to co-opt people such as Solomon Dalton of BDO, who could provide financial advice and also draw on the support of the Ministry of Primary Industries and Ministry for Maori Development.

The attendees also approved a high level strategy, which included a vision statement, mission, core values and key goals. These goals included making sure that a greater share of any value is returned to the Maori land owners, to build scale and certainty of supply and to implement value-added manufacturing.

Source: The Northern Advocate

To read the full story click here

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Matakana Island land use dispute goes to court

Tauranga developer Carrus Corp wants to nearly double the number of rural lifestyle subdivisions allowed on the forested side of Matakana Island. The Western Bay council's planning vision for the island has been challenged by the three owners of the 4300 hectares of plantation forests. Carrus will line up with TKC Holdings and Blakely Pacific next month when their appeals against the council's plan for the island will be heard by the Environment Court.

The landowners are seeking greater flexibility around the rules that focus on cultural and environmental safeguards to help preserve the island's "unique way of life".

A major thrust of the plan was to stop the island being carved up into 40ha blocks - as currently permitted in other rural areas of the district. The council proposes to keep the underlying rule of one house per 40ha but to force the houses into clusters of at least 10 lots per cluster.

Each lot would be no bigger than one hectare. It would result in 7 per cent of the forested side of Matakana being taken up by clusters, allowing better evacuation and protection from hazards such as fires and tsunami.

Carrus is in a Scorpian joint venture with the Faulkner family, which owns 170ha of the forests - most of it on the southern coastal side of the island. It wants to give land owners the discretion to exceed the one house per 40ha rule, which would permit 102 house lots to be created. It is seeking a maximum of 200 house lots.

Counsel for Carrus, Vanessa Hamm, said there should be flexibility in determining the scale of rural lifestyle clusters in suitable locations. Carrus said there was a disparity between papakainga marae housing development intensity and development intensity on the forested side of Matakana, saying it unfairly restricted development for the forest land owners. While Carrus agreed with the council's intention to stop houses being scattered throughout the forest, it argued that subdivision should be allowed for farming lots provided there was no dwelling.

TKC Holdings said the council's approach to subdivision was overly rigid and would result in something more akin to an urban area. It said the clustering would likely require mass deforestation, communal wastewater facilities and a "peri urban feel". TKC said forestry needed to be a permitted activity to give owners greater certainty than having to rely on existing use rights. It also feared that the rule banning development in areas with significant ecological features would impact on all their blocks because each had significant ecological notations on the plan.

It criticised the plan's objectives for Matakana Island, saying it was more of an abstract statement than something to be achieved under an RMA framework. Among the wording it sought to remove from the statement was "unique way of life" and the word "rich" from "rich cultural values".

Blakely Pacific argued that the plan constrained development inappropriately.

Source: Bay of Plenty Times

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Fire crew response saves forest

Fire crews have been praised for swiftly responding to an out-of-season blaze at a forestry block near Tinui early yesterday.

The fire, which could potentially have caused millions of dollars' worth of damage to the 400ha block, occurred about 30km from Tinui on Tinui Valley Rd at about 3.15am. An Amalgamated helicopter with monsoon buckets was brought in to control the fire, as well as appliances from Tinui, Castlepoint and Masterton, and a watertanker from Carterton were used.

Masterton fire station officer Kevin Smith said crews were still dampening down the 4ha fire at mid-morning. The fire started in a cutover below a skid where trees were being logged.

Eighteen firefighters were called in to fight the blaze, as well as crews from Juken New Zealand (JNL) and Horne Logging.

The manager of the partnership that owns the block, John McKinstry, said he was extremely grateful to all those who helped, especially the fire crew from JNL.

"We have much appreciation for the turnout of people. The turnout and support we received was fantastic."

It was believed one of the wire hauler ropes, which was leaning on rocks, may have been the cause of the fire.

As the block was being harvested there was very little damage, he said.

"Luckily it never got up around the hauler because it costs about $2 million to replace. We were very lucky the wind didn't come up."

Wairarapa principal rural fire officer Phill Wishnowsky said: "Teams were able to get there in the middle of the night and stop the fire causing millions of dollars' worth of damage." Forestry crews were normally careful and this kind of fire was quite unusual, Mr Wishnowsky said.

"It's not common but when they do happen they can be very, very troublesome and very, very expensive."

People were advised to be mindful of the changing conditions.

Fire crews were expected to remain on site until today to monitor the situation.

Summer fire restrictions are not yet in place for the Wairarapa rural fire district.

Source: Wairarapa Times

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Australia’s 10 deadliest jobs

Truckies, posties and warehouse workers top the list of Australia's deadliest jobs, according to new research. The transport and storage industry recorded the highest number of deaths, with 65 workers killed on the job in 2012, according to a popular life insurance website.

Transport and storage workers accounted for nearly one-third of all workplace deaths that year. The agriculture, forestry and fishing category is Australia's second-most dangerous line of work, with 53 deaths in 2012. Workers in this industry are more likely to die from being hit by an animal, drowning and heat exposure than any other industry on the top 10 list, the research found.

Finder spokeswoman Michelle Hutchison said vehicle collisions caused most fatalities, with one in three workplace deaths occurring on the road. Muscular stress while lifting, carrying or putting down objects was the most common cause of serious injury across all industries.

"Many Australian workers have to drive vehicles or lift things as part of their job and they may not realise how dangerous their work can be," she said.

Construction workers have the third-most dangerous job, with 30 fatalities in 2012. Falling from a height was the most common cause of death, accounting for 40 per cent of construction deaths. Manufacturing – Australia's fourth-deadliest industry – also had the highest rate of injury, with 16,670 or 1.8 per cent of workers injured in 2012, according to the research.

Source: Sydney Morning Herald

To read the full story click here

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Safety Alert - Defensive driving tips

Details of Incident / Close Call:
A good defense can win you an Olympic gold medal and it can also keep you safe on your drive to work. Recently, there have been several collisions involving pickups and log trucks.

Here’s a summary of three of these incidents:

A crew cab towing a trailer was travelling up a resource road and shortly after making a radio call at 18km, the crew heard an undecipherable noise on the radio. The driver started to ask for the transmission to be repeated when a loaded logging truck came around the corner. Both drivers proceeded to take evasive action and the pickup’s trailer slid out and contacted the tires on the logging truck’s trailer. This pulled the rear of the pickup into the trailer causing considerable damage to both vehicles. All drivers and passengers were wearing seatbelts and there were no injuries.

A pickup truck travelling on a logging road entered a corner and collided head-on with an empty logging truck travelling toward the logging work site. The driver of the pickup truck sustained serious head and chest injuries; the driver of the logging truck was not injured.
br> A loaded logging truck and an empty logging truck met on a stretch of snow-covered forest service road. The empty truck swerved to avoid direct collision and hit the rock wall cut. Injuries included a sore neck and possible injury to the driver’s lower body.

Learnings and Suggestions:
- A good, safe day starts with the proper preparation. Get enough rest and do your pre-trip inspection to make sure your vehicle is road worthy.
- Don’t rely on the radio alone to indicate where all the vehicles are on the road.
- Don’t be shy, do a radio check! Make sure you can communicate before hitting the road and know the communication protocols for the area.
- Don’t rush. Trying to make it to the next pull-out before meeting oncoming traffic can lead to a collision. If you have passengers, use them to help you listen to radio calls. Train your passengers to be good co-pilots instead of distractions.
- Get a clear signal that it is OK to pass before going by trucks on resource roads.
- If you don’t have a radio, consider following a radio equipped vehicle or choosing an alternate route if industrial traffic is heavy.
- Always remember the last line of defense – your seatbelt.

Source: BC Forest Safe

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Watchdog hails falling forest fatalities in BC

Roger Harris knows from personal experience the importance of safety in the forest industry. He has witnessed the impact that injuries and fatalities can have on workers and their families, starting with his own. In 1986, while working as a falling contractor, his right hand was nearly severed when his chain saw kicked back. His brother-in-law was killed in a forestry accident at age 18.

Those experiences, combined with his varied career in the forest industry – he has been everything from a logging camp dishwasher to a phase logging contractor to a politician (Skeena Riding), make Harris an ideal fit as the BC Forest Safety Ombudsman. He has served as ombudsman since the role was created in 2006 by the BC Forest Safety Council. He has since published a number of provincial reviews along with recommendations for improving safety within the sector.

He recently in rural BC recently to discuss the current situation in the forest industry and the role he plays as ombudsman in ensuring safety remains a priority.

“This is an industry that, regardless of everything else, is still in every community in BC,” said Harris. “It may not be the No. 1 industry on any given day, but it’s important to all of us.” Harris began his forestry career as an 18-year-old in 1972 in Haida Gwaii. He said it was the year tree fallers went on strike voicing concerns over safety issues, and rightfully so. 62 men died in BC’s forests that year.

Now fatalities year-on-year are falling in the industry. He is thankful to see the curve moving downwards, but said he won’t be happy until the annual figure is zero. The two most dangerous jobs in BC’s forest industry continue to be falling and truck driving. The most recent statistic in 2012 saw 12 people die. There have been just two fatalities so far in 2014.

Harris noted one thing the fatalities chart doesn’t account for is the number of forestry workers who are maimed or permanently disabled every year. Whereas the number of deaths has decreased, he said the number of injuries has actually risen due to a combination of advancing medical care and improved evacuation methods.

Harris can attest to that. When he injured his hand, he was on a hospital operating table within hours, and they were able to sew his hand back together. He has no feeling in his fingers, but his hand is intact.

But rather than introduce rules and regulations that might hinder industry, Harris would rather see what he refers to as “a change in culture.”

“People always have a view that you can legislate safety,” he said. “There is not a whole lot of evidence to support that. That’s people looking for simple solutions to complex problems.”

Harris has already seen a massive shift in forestry workers’ attitudes from the fearless loggers of the ‘70s. “There was a bravado about this industry that said: ‘I’m tough.”

Harris himself shared that mentality. As the most senior faller in his crew back in the day, he would be the one left to fall the most dangerous trees as they made their way through a block. Now, he just shakes his head, wondering why he placed that extra risk upon himself in an already-hazardous job. Now logging companies employ specialist danger tree blasters to eliminate the risk of manual falling by using blasting technology.

The outlook of logging companies is also changing for the better, said Harris. Gone is the notion that safety concerns are not only costly, but also a hindrance to productivity. Harris said quite the opposite is true. “The industry has come around to understand that being safe is a smart business decision,” he said.

Image: Roger Harris addresses a small crowd on the current state of B.C. forest safety at a recent talk at the Schubert Centre in Vernon.— Image Credit: Graeme Corbett/Morning Star

Source: Vernon Morning Star

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China bans logging in state forests

China has halted commercial logging by state firms in forests in Heilongjiang, in a move experts see as a significant step to curb over-exploitation of timber, reports chinadialogue.

China has launched a trial ban on commercial logging in state-owned forests in the vast north- eastern province of Heilongjiang bordering Russia, home to much of the country’s timber industry. Forestry experts have hailed the ban as a major step forward, predicting it will enable timber supplies to recover and shift the industry’s focus towards improved forestry management.

To make the ban stick, the central government has allocated 2.35bn yuan a year to cover forestry workers’ living costs between 2014 and 2020, chinadialogue has learned from the State Forestry Administration (SFA). If the trial ban is successful, the policy may be extended throughout north east China and Inner Mongolia.

Replacement industries – Sheng Weitong, a forestry expert and former advisor to China’s cabinet-level state council, told chinadialogue that some laid-off loggers “will become forest rangers and learn how to manage forests because the vast numbers of young and semi-mature trees in these districts need management. Workers here neglected forest management in the past.”

Others will be encouraged to develop alternative industries such as tourism, growing blueberries, ginseng, edible mushrooms, and flowers, or raising chickens and frogs. Existing laws are thought sufficient to tackle illegal logging.

The ban in Heilongjiang affects two important state-owned logging firms, Longjiang Forest Industry and Daxing Anling Forestry Company (Anling Forestry), and signifies a shift towards forest conservation, rather than utilisation, Sheng says.

The two companies manage 18.45m hectares of forests, covering 39% of the entire province of Heilongjiang, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

Source: The Guardian

To read the full story click here

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Is Your Garage Door Boring…?

Are you fed up with looking daily at your boring garage door?

Just stick a poster on it!!

There is a German company called "Style your Garage" that makes posters for garage doors - Check them out!




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Buy and Sell


... and finally ... clever senior citizens ...

The rain was pouring and there was a big puddle in front of the pub.

A ragged old man was standing there with a rod and hanging a string into the puddle.

A tipsy- looking, curious gentleman came over to him and asked what he was doing.

'Fishing,' the old man said simply.

'Poor old fool,' the gentleman thought and he invited the ragged old man to a drink in the pub.

As he felt he should start some conversation while they were sipping their whisky, the gentleman asked,

'And how many have you caught?'

'You're the eighth,' the old man answered.

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A young man shopping in a supermarket noticed a little old lady following him around. If he stopped, she stopped. Furthermore she kept staring at him.

She finally overtook him at the checkout, and she turned to him and said, "I hope I haven't made you feel ill at ease; it's just that you lookso much like my late son."

He answered, "That's okay."

She then said, "I know it's silly, but if you'd call out 'Good bye, Mom' as I leave the store, it would make me feel so happy."

She then went through the checkout, and as she was on her way out of the store, the man called out, "Goodbye, Mom." The little old lady waved and smiled back at him. Pleased that he had brought a little sunshine into someone's day, he went to pay for his groceries.

"That comes to £150.00," said the clerk.

"How come so much? I only bought 5 items."

The clerk replied, "Yeah, but your Mother said you'd be paying for her things, too."



Have a safe and prosperous week.

John Stulen
Editor
PO Box 1230
Building X91, Scion Campus, 99 Sala Street
Rotorua, New Zealand
Tel +64 27 275 8011
Web www.woodweek.com

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