WoodWeek – 14 November 2018

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Greetings from your keen WoodWeek news team. The plant nursery industry is calling for the Government to make quicker progress with the One Billion Trees plan. The Government is aiming to plant one billion trees by 2027. “It’s going to take a while to scale up,” Forestry Ministry Shane Jones said. So far, 60,642,000 trees have been planted since the One Billion Trees plan was announced.

However, forestry officials working on the flagship plan ordered more than one million pine seedlings for a block of land so choked with scrub and weeds planting couldn't go ahead. Official documents show Te Uru Rakau planned to plant 1100ha with pine this year and had ordered about 1,100,000 seedlings for that. The number of seedlings able to be planted collapsed to 191,000 as the condition of the land was revealed.

MPI has yet to put a dollar figure on the cost to taxpayers, but market rates for seedlings put the cost of the order at about $400,000. The Minister claims the cost to the taxpayer is more like $160,000 and as the story continued in the news, a local iwi has taken responsibility for the lack of land preparation.

Solving challenges both forestry and farming and improving productivity through technology will be key themes at next year’s MobileTECH 2019. Now in its 7th year, MobileTECH will, once again, bring together the agri-tech leaders, tech developers, industry corporates and early adopters into Rotorua.

“New Zealand’s agritech sector is quickly expanding and the technology is world-class,” said Ken Wilson, programme manager for MobileTECH 2019. “While we have seen some great advances in sensors and robotics, it’s the software that’s making big strides.”

A recent industry study showed that digital products and services will make up 55% of New Zealand’s GDP by 2021. Over this time, digital transformation will be providing better margins for companies. Estimates are that this will add over NZ$10 billion to NZ’s national GDP.

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Gough CAT signs with Weiler

Gough Cat has just announced the have an agreement with United States company Weiler Incorporated to distribute its forestry product line in New Zealand.

Founded in 2000, Weiler has a long history of successfully manufacturing equipment distributed through the global Cat dealer network, says Gough Cat Executive General Manager Chris Heaton.

“These products complement the Caterpillar forestry machines that Gough Cat will continue to offer and we are excited about continuing to supply our customers a wide range of products.”

Gough Cat will distribute and service Weiler forestry products, including wheel skidders and track feller bunchers, while continuing to provide and service Cat’s forestry 500 series purpose-built forestry machines designed for log loading, harvesting and other New Zealand forestry applications.

“Gough Cat and Weiler look forward to growing our relationship further through distributing this portfolio of products for the forestry industry through our extensive dealer network throughout New Zealand,” says Chris Heaton.

“We are excited to have Gough Cat as the exclusive Weiler dealer for New Zealand, their great history of product support and taking care of customers fits our needs to continue to grow the Weiler brand,” says Pat Weiler, owner and founder of Weiler.

“We remain strongly committed to our forestry business and expect Weiler’s forestry customers will benefit greatly from the exceptional sales and service that Gough Cat are proud to be known for,” says Chris Heaton.

The new agreement follows an announcement by Caterpillar Inc in August that it had entered into a preliminary agreement to sell some of its forestry business to Weiler.

Weiler paving and drill products will be available in New Zealand later this year, with forestry products becoming available early in 2019, as Caterpillar transitions these forest products.

“This is a positive move and a smooth transition is well underway, supported by Weiler’s proven track record of working with Cat dealers all over the world,” says Chris Heaton.

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1BT: Nurseries call for quicker action

The plant nursery industry is calling for the Government to make quicker progress with the One Billion Trees plan.

The Government is aiming to plant one billion trees by 2027. “It’s going to take a while to scale up,” Forestry Ministry Shane Jones said. So far, 60,642,000 trees have been planted since the One Billion Trees plan was announced.

“By the time the next election comes, we would well and truly have cracked our hundred-million mark - a mix of exotics and native,” Mr Jones said.

The Ministry for Primary Industries estimates 500 million trees will be planted through current national rates, but it’s been tasked with increasing the rate of planting to provide the other 500 million.

Lyndale Nurseries director Malcolm Woolmore told TV1 News the industry wants to see greater details and action to know the programme is “real".

He said the nursery industry has the capacity to reach the goal but need to know what natives are required, where and when.

“Ninety per cent of tree production is made to contract orders,” Mr Woolmore said, explaining that some natives can take up to five years to grow for selling.

“What they need to do is create contracts, put them in front of nurseries and with real commitment - which means some money.”

Mr Woolmore also said MPI needs greater support to deliver its role in the plan.

More >>





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US timber tariff: Who will benefit?

China announced a 25% tariff on US imports, on a value of $16 billion from 23 August. The taxed products include $1.83 billion of wood products and logs.

A large range of wood products are listed in the tariff list, including oak logs, birch logs, OSB, spruce, larch, teak, wooden window frames, shelves, furniture etc.

China is the biggest importer for American wood products. The United States exported 6.14 million m3 logs to China, accounting for 53.9% of US logs, and 3.27 m3 lumber, accounting for 38% of US sawn timber exports, according to the U.S Bureau of Statistics. The China market represents half of total US log exports, and one third of its sawn timber exports.

The US tariffs will increase the cost of US wood imports, which will make America timber gradually lose its competitiveness and market position in China.

China Timber has forecast that Chinese buyers may turn to other countries such as Russia and Europe as the properties of timber from those countries are very similar to that of the US.

Source: ITTO MIS Report (October)





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Primary industries being transformed

Solving rural producers’ challenges and improving productivity through technology will be key themes at next year’s MobileTECH 2019. Now in its 7th year, MobileTECH will, once again, bring together the agritech leaders, tech developers, industry corporates and early adopters into Rotorua.

“New Zealand’s agritech sector is quickly expanding and the technology is world- class,” said Ken Wilson, programme manager for MobileTECH 2019. “While we have seen some great advances in sensors and robotics, it’s the software that’s making big strides.”

A recent IDC study, commissioned by Microsoft, showed that digital products and services will make up 55% of New Zealand’s GDP by 2021. Over this time, digital transformation will be providing better margins for companies and its estimated will have added over NZ$10 billion to NZ’s national GDP.

What’s striking is the speed and widespread impact of change, forcing many traditional companies to evolve with it. Digital technologies leading this charge include innovations like mobility, cloud computing, Internet of Things and artificial intelligence.

This comes off the back of a report last year by the Massey Business School, which examined the impact of cloud computing and other disruptive technologies on the agricultural sector. After interviewing technologists and agri-food producers, there was a wide gap in how these two groups perceived the industry in the future.

Lead researcher, Professor Stephen Kelly, was quoted as saying, “what the agrifood sector is currently doing is brilliant, they are agile, very accepting of new technology and continually looking for better ways of doing things. But most aren’t visualising what the industry will look like in 10 years’ time.” This could have major implications for the sector.

Globally, there are 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created every day. Over 90% of the world's data has been created within the last two years. Technologies like the Internet of Things will dramatically increase these numbers. The problem is no longer about how to collect data – it’s how to get the right answers at the right time for the right purpose.

Our farms, forests and worksites are becoming more connected than ever and we are rapidly accumulating data. Remote sensors are in our fields, GPS units track our vehicles, UAVs and satellites provide imagery data and electronic tagging is optimising distribution. The primary sector now has more data points than can be comprehended. The demand is now not just technology, but how to get the right analysis, recommendations and application.

“Tech developers see software advances and hands-on collaboration with local producers as the key ingredients going forward,” said Mr Wilson. “With the central theme for MobileTECH 2019 being ‘data with purpose’, we will be highlighting a number of case studies where new tools are created alongside the farmer, grower, orchardist or forestry managers.”

Further details on the MobileTECH 2019 programme can be found on the event website, www.mobiletech.events. The event runs on 3-4 April 2019 in Rotorua, New Zealand.



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Weed-choked land causes bottleneck

Forestry officials working on the Government's flagship One Billion Trees plan ordered more than one million pine seedlings for a block of land so choked with scrub and weeds planting couldn't go ahead - Forestry Minister Shane Jones told the Herald "ambition" and "enthusiasm" had a part to play in planting delays which struck the $32 million inaugural joint venture on the Far North forestry block.

Official documents show the Government planned to plant 1100ha with pine this year and had ordered about 1,100,000 seedlings for that.

The number of seedlings able to be planted collapsed to 191,000 as the condition of the land was revealed.

The Ministry for Primary Industries has yet to put a dollar figure on the cost to taxpayers, but market rates for seedlings put the cost of the order at about $400,000.

The deal between the Crown and the Far North's Ngati Hine Forestry Trust was trumpeted by the Beehive as the first Crown joint venture in the One Billion Trees programme.

Documents released through the Official Information Act show Jones sealed the agreement during a May 31 ceremony on a Ngati Hine forestry block, at which he planted a tree using a shovel engraved with his name.

More >>

For the next chapter in this story, see Radio NZ's (RNZ) story where the Minister claims the cost is only $160,000.

More >>

And, what appears to be the final chapter: Now the local iwi have taken responsibility for the botch-up (see further RNZ reporting below).

Even more >>

Source: NZHerald and RNZ

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Scion: Mrytle rust research update

When myrtle rust arrived in New Zealand in 2017 it was all hands on deck for many of the country’s research providers. Scion is part of a multi-disciplinary research team focused on learning what we can about myrtle rust in New Zealand, conserving the susceptible species and developing effective ways to manage it.

Achieving a robust research baseline - Over the year since myrtle rust was discovered, a number of new and diverse research programmes have begun.

Scion is leading a new approach to engagement with Maori and interested groups including horticulturalists, conservation groups, government departments, regional councils and science groups. The focus of bringing these groups together is to create a consistent approach to the long-term monitoring and surveillance of myrtle rust. This will ensure that all groups are using the same measures New Zealand wide, creating a reliable baseline that can be compared against overseas data. Work to develop a system and tools to complete this surveillance and monitoring will take place next year.

The team also has begun collecting seed for exotic and native Myrtaceae around New Zealand and is working closely with mana whenua around the country to obtain seed from taonga species in accordance with local tikanga. The germplasm of these plants is retained by mana whenua and either stored on their behalf or returned to them. Future work will see engagement with iwi and seed collection undertaken across the nation.

Some of this seed is being sent to Australia to test against the same strain of myrtle rust as is present in New Zealand because currently testing cannot be done in New Zealand. Seed is also being sent to South Africa and South America where different strains of myrtle rust are present.

“By sending our seed to our southern hemisphere neighbours, we can compare our material against theirs and gauge how susceptible New Zealand’s myrtles are,” says Research Leader Dr Beccy Ganley.

Back on the home ground, Scion is working with Plant and Food Research and Manaaki Whenua, preparing comprehensive reviews investigating the potential for resistance breeding and control methods suitable for New Zealand conditions.

Scion is also leading a social science theme to the myrtle rust response. By exploring engagement and social licence, we are gaining a new perspective on the response to the initial incursion, and how it might be improved going forward into long-term management or for future incursion responses.

Dr Rebecca Martin, Ministry for Primary Industries Myrtle Rust Research Programme Coordinator, and Senior Adviser, Conservation, says: “Scion’s highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary research programme is integral to New Zealand’s understanding of both the impacts of myrtle rust over the long-term here, but also how we manage and deal with those impacts. This essential research programme, along with the inter- linked themes led by Plant and Food Research, will help deliver improved management tools and greater understanding for myrtle rust’s behaviour and impacts here, and will help to enable all New Zealander’s to protect their taonga and iconic myrtle plants, and their associated species and ecosystems.”

These projects are an important beginning in what promises to be a hard fought battle for New Zealand’s beloved Myrtaceae plants.

Source: Scion

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Recycling brings roundwood competitor

Milk bottles might soon be appearing on farms up and down the country, but you won’t find them in the fridge.

Fonterra has teamed up with Kiwi-owned start up, Future Post™, to turn milk bottles and other soft plastics into fence posts for kiwi farms.

Fonterra Brands New Zealand’s (FBNZ) Sustainability and Environment Manager, Larisa Thathiah, says the posts are an innovative new way for farmers to improve their on-farm sustainability.

“This partnership provides farmers with an environmentally-friendly fencing option, made from the packaging of our farmers’ milk, which is pretty special,” says Larisa.

“It’s not enough to just recycle anymore, it’s about creating less waste full stop, or at least turning it into something useful. That’s why these fence posts are so exciting – they’re made from 100% recycled material, and have a life expectancy of more than 50 years.”

The Future Post™ partnership is the latest waste reduction initiative from Fonterra. Last year, the Co-op partnered with SKYCITY to turn Anchor™ Light Proof™ milk bottles into shampoo, conditioner and body lotion bottles for guests.

Managing Director of Future Post™, Jerome Wenzlick, says it’s great to have support from Fonterra and he’s looking forward to developing other sustainable products for farmers.

“What we’re doing is repurposing waste that could have gone to landfill and turning it in to a valuable product for consumers,” says Jerome.

“Our partnership with Fonterra gives us access to a steady supply of raw material from the Co-op’s own recycling initiatives. It also gives us access to a network of nationwide Farm Source stores that can sell the fence posts, and access to 10,000 farmers who are actively engaged in environmental initiatives, like fencing to keep cows out of waterways and planting along river banks.”

“Future Post™ is a start-up, but we have plans for some new products in 2019, including those for non-farming sectors.”

Anchor Light Proof milk bottles are collected from the Fonterra Takanini site and transported to the Future Post Waiuku plant, where they are mixed with soft plastics and turned into fence posts.

The fence posts will be available in selected Fonterra Farm Source stores across the North Island in the New Year, with plans to launch in South Island stores mid-2019.

Fonterra CEO Miles Hurrell and Future Post Managing Director Jerome Wenzlick revealed a first peak at the posts at Fonterra’s Open Gates event in Karaka.

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Forests Act: Swamp kauri ruling

New Zealand's highest court has ruled that exporting slabs of swamp kauri as "tabletops" or swamp kauri logs as "totem or temple poles" is illegal under the Forests Act.

The decision marks an important victory for the Northland Environmental Protection Society, which has challenged the Ministry of Primary Industries, Customs Department and Ministry of Culture and Heritage through the courts to close down the export trade in unimproved slabs and logs of the rare and lucrative resource.

"A slab of swamp kauri labelled a table top would not fit" the definition of manufactured product in the Act, the judges concluded. "The use as a table could not be discerned from the product itself. Further, a table top is not a product in its own right and thus is not ready to be installed in a larger structure."

While the five judges of the Supreme Court did not agree that pieces of swamp kauri were covered by the Protected Objects Act, the ruling means that unless a swamp kauri exporter turns such a slab into a real piece of furniture, the loophole under which such timber has been exported to date is now closed.

The Forests Act defines a manufactured product for export as needing to be sent over the wharves "without the need for further machining or other modification”.

"The product must be ready to be used or installed in the form which it is to be exported," the judgment released today says. The judges also accepted that a component of a product could not have been intended to mean any piece of a product.

"A single component cannot come in kitset form," the Supreme Court ruled. "Nor can it sensibly be said to have been assembled. Further, this interpretation would in many cases subvert the purpose of ensuring value is added in New Zealand.

"Accordingly, an indigenous wood product that is the component of an item ... is one that forms part of a product in its own right and either has been assembled and is ready to install or is in kitset form and ready to be installed once assembled."

Likewise, logs would "almost always require modification before being ready for use or installation," the judges said. "Merely labelling a log a totem or temple pole does not change this."

"A log cannot be a finished or manufactured indigenous timber product unless the work on it is so extensive that it has lost its identity as a log. Surface carving or decoration, however elaborate, is unlikely to cause such a loss of identity. In most cases, any value added in New Zealand by surface carving or decoration is likely to be minimal."

Where tabletops were concerned, adding legs or other mountings or producing the product as a self-assembly kitset would not be enough to get around the law, although "a crafted rustic bespoke table would clearly come within" the legal definition of a value-added product, "even if the table had a table top that, considered alone, could be classified as rough sawn timber."

On the claim that swamp kauri should be covered by the Protected Objects Act, however, the Supreme Court agreed with the Court of Appeal that the law was intended to apply to individual items.

"The Act is not designed ... to protect natural materials such as swamp kauri in bulk. It is true that protected New Zealand object is defined to include a collection or assemblage of objects but these terms imply that the collection or assemblage is in one place or in the hands of one owner. That does not apply to swamp kauri."

The judges also urged Parliament to reconsider how the Forests Act treats swamp kauri, given that the legislation's focus is mainly on living trees and because kauri itself is threatened by the kauri dieback disease. Nor was it clear that exports of swamp kauri stumps should be allowed, even though the export of stumps of recently felled kauri is permitted.

Source: Scoop news

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Review rates NZ on climate change

A government research programme has positioned New Zealand as a world-leader in research into mitigating greenhouse gases from agriculture and adapting to climate change, a recent independent review has found.

The Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI’s) Sustainable Land Management and Climate Change (SLMACC) research programme supports the generation of new climate change knowledge across New Zealand’s agriculture and forestry sectors.

The independent review found SLMACC has triggered new research, and boosted New Zealand’s understanding of the potential impacts and implications of climate change for a range of primary industries, particularly pastoral farming systems and responding to drought.

“Climate change affects every one of New Zealand’s land-based producers, from farmers, growers and foresters, to the communities that support them,” says Steve Penno, Director Investment Programmes at MPI.

“New Zealand relies heavily on its natural environment and the primary production it supports. A warming planet poses challenges and unknowns, so it’s vital to invest in research to better understand the land-based sector’s future operating environment and, importantly, how a country like ours must adapt.”

“SLMACC has contributed heavily towards growing this understanding and enhancing the science capability needed.”

“The review found it’s creating high quality research, engaging stakeholders and end- users, growing climate change science capability in New Zealand, enabling international collaborations and supporting researchers early in their careers to build their capability and experience.

“A number of other SLMACC benefits were supported by the review, such as building more accurate knowledge about long-term carbon storage in our forests and providing resources to increase awareness of climate change and practical options for use on- farm.”

The SLMACC research programme recently celebrated its 10-year anniversary, marking an investment of around $50 million in more than 150 targeted basic, applied and policy research projects. A number of its projects are showcased in Investing in tomorrow, a booklet released in September 2018.

Investing in tomorrow and copies of the review reports (including a summary of findings) are available on the Sustainable Land Management and Climate Change web page at mpi.govt.nz/funding.

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Salt: Carbon fund launched

Salt’s Carbon Fund Debuts on the NZX - Ticker code confirmed as CO2 – Salt Investment Funds Limited (Salt) is proud to be listing New Zealand’s first-ever Carbon Fund (Fund) on the NZX today, which will trade under the ticker code ‘CO2’.

Salt has initially raised more than $1 million in applications from a diverse group of retail and institutional investors. The Fund is open-ended and will continue to accept applications with a strong pipeline of interest.

Paul Harrison, Managing Director of Salt, said: “We want to acknowledge and welcome all our initial investors in the Carbon Fund, and we look forward to receiving ongoing applications.

“There has been a healthy level of interest and support. This is uncharted territory for many investors, so we are particularly pleased with the result.

“We are receiving interest in the fund from three broad investor categories: those seeking to invest in the future price of carbon as a commodity; those with a financial risk exposed to a higher price on carbon; and those who want to contribute to slowing climate change.

“Listing the fund on the NZX is about providing investors with a transparent and dynamic trading environment, which in turn will build a stronger understanding of the investor market for carbon,” said Mr Harrison.

“We started work on bringing a Carbon Fund to market more than six years ago. Now is the right time to be doing this – ahead of the significant social, economic, environmental and technological change coming in response to our warming climate,” he added.

The fund’s risk rating is calculated as high. Salt encourages any interested investor to seek independent financial advice before making any investment decision. Investors can continue to invest directly in the Carbon Fund throughwww.carbonfund.co.nz.

The Carbon Fund is managed by Salt Investment Funds Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Salt Funds Management Limited. The Product Disclosure Statement can be found on www.carbonfund.co.nz.

More >>

Source: Scoop News

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Jobs



Buy and Sell



... and finally ... ha ha ha ...

How to Tell the Sex of a Fly

A woman walked into the kitchen to find her husband standing around with a fly swatter.

"What are you doing?" she asked.

"Hunting flies" he responded.
"Oh really ... killing any?" She asked.

"Yep, got 3 males and 2 females," he replied.

Intrigued, she asked, "how can you tell them apart?"

He responded,
"3 were on a beer can, 2 were on the phone."

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Andrew the drover from a huge cattle station in the Australian
outback appeared before St. Peter at the Pearly Gates.

"Have you ever done anything of particular merit?" St. Peter asked.
"Well, I can think of one thing," the drover offered.
"Once, on a trip to the back blocks of Broken Hill out in New South Wales,
I came across a gang of bikers who were threatening a young sheila.

I told them to leave her alone, but they wouldn't listen.
So I approached the largest and most heavily tattooed biker and smacked
him in the face, kicked his bike over, ripped out his nose ring, and threw it on the ground.

I yelled, "Now, back off!! Or I'll kick the crap out of the lot of ya!"

St. Peter was impressed, "When did this happen?"

"A couple of minutes ago."

----------------------------

Here are some thoughtful signs spotted out there:

In a podiatrist's office:
"Time wounds all heels."

At an optometrist's office:
"If you don't see what you're looking for, you've come to the right place."

On a plumber's van:
"We repair what your husband fixed."

On a Maternity Room door:
"Push. Push. Push."

--------------------------------------------------------------

Finally, we may need your help here to decide if this advertisement belongs in the jokes section or not. Have a peek and talk about it amongst yourselves:





That's all for this week's wood news.

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John Stulen
Editor
Innovatek Limited
PO Box 1230
Rotorua, New Zealand
Mob: +64 27 275 8011
Web: www.woodweek.com

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